New Hampshire Bar Association
About the Bar
For Members
For the Public
Legal Links
Publications
Newsroom
Online Store
Vendor Directory
NH Bar Foundation
Judicial Branch
NHMCLE

Everything you need to purchase a court bond is just a click away.

Visit the NH Bar Association's Lawyer Referral Service (LRS) website for information about how our trained staff can help you find an attorney who is right for you.
New Hampshire Bar Association
Lawyer Referral Service Law Related Education NHBA CLE NHBA Insurance Agency

Member Login
username and password

Bar News - May 13, 2011


Nineteen 50-year Members Will Be Honored at Annual Meeting

T. William Bigelow
Joan L. Carroll
Paul F. Cavanaugh
William Congreve, III
Charles A. DeGrandpre
Rodney N. Dyer
Glen E. Graper
 
               Hon. Bernard J. Hampsey, Jr.
Hon. Douglas S. Hatfield
David J. KillKelley
Hon. Albert D. Leahy, Jr.
Chester H. Lopez, Jr.
Norman H. Makechnie
               Hon. Francis B. McCaffrey
Joseph M. McDonough, III
Frederick W. Murdock, Jr.
David W. O’Brien
R. Peter Shapiro
Otto F. Stock, Jr.
  
   

Having reached the milestone of 50 years in the legal profession this year (based on first admission to practice in any state), nineteen NH Bar members and will be honored at the Annual Meeting on Friday evening, June 24 at a reception and dinner at the Omni Mount Washington Hotel in Breton Woods. These attorneys have lived through times of great change, both here in their own country and in the world; they have seen many wars and some have served in the armed services. They have also witnessed many changes in the justice system itself.

These members were sent questionnaires by Bar News, asking them about their lives; of the several who replied, five are highlighted in this issue. The remaining members will be featured in our June issue.

Glen F. Graper


Glen F. Graper
BAR NEWS: Please tell us how you feel about reaching this 50-year milestone and whether you are still practicing law.
I am still practicing law and looking back, it doesn’t seem possible that it has been 50 years.

BN: Where were you born, raised and educated?
I was born in Schenectady, NY, and educated at Albany Academy in Albany, at Middlebury College and Boston University Law School.

BN: Why did you decide to become a lawyer? Who are/were your role models in the field of law or elsewhere?
I decided to become a lawyer because I couldn’t think of anything else I wanted to do or was qualified for. I knew a lot of things I didn’t want to do. There were/are no particular role models, but there are many in the profession whom I respect.

BN: Please tell us about significant career positions (before and/or after law school), such as, place of employment (law firm, city) and in which areas of the law you practiced.
Out of law school, I was employed by Boynton, Waldron & Dill in Portsmouth for several years. I was the Rockingham County Attorney for two terms in the late 60s. I have been in general practice in my own firm in Portsmouth ever since.

BN: What achievements are you most proud of professionally? Are there any moments in your career that were particularly significant for you? Did you take part in any memorable/notable cases that you would like to mention?
Just providing day-to-day, hopefully, competent professional services to clients and to the community while mainly keeping myself out of trouble. I am a member of the Rockingham County Bar Assoc. and the NH Bar Association and NH Bar foundation. I am licensed to practice before the US Supreme Court.

BN: Please tell us about any community activities that have been of great significance to you and why.
I am a member and former director of the Portsmouth Yacht Club and a former director for the Portsmouth Salvation Army.

I’m a member of the Newfoundland Club of America; the NC of NE (New England) Rescue; the York County Kennel Club; the Elks club; the Portsmouth Athletic Club; and a member of the First Christian Church of Freedom.

BN: Please tell us about your family (marriage(s), children, etc.).
My wife Mary Lou works in my office. We have three children: Jeffrey, Richard and Matthew; all live in NH.

BN: Do you special plans for your retirement?
I have no special retirement plans. My wife and I live on an old sheep farm in Freedom, NH and commute to the office in Portsmouth four days a week with our two Newfoundland dogs. We sail, ski and participate in our small town’s very active community. We will probably do more of the same when/if we retire. We will stay active in ND rescue through the NC of NE.


Hon. Bernard J. Hampsey, Jr.


Hon. Bernard J. Hampsey, Jr.
BN: 
Please tell us how you feel about reaching this 50-year milestone and whether you are still practicing law.
I am simply grateful for just being around for this milestone. I retired from law practice when I was appointed to the NH Superior Court in 1990. I retired from the bench in 2007.

BN: Where were you born, raised and educated?
I was born in Pittsburgh, PA – home of the Steelers (just lost the super bowl). Graduated from Holy Cross 1958 and from Duquesne U. Law School in 1961.

BN: Why did you decide to become a lawyer? Who are/were your role models in the field of law or elsewhere?
I became a lawyer because my father was a lawyer in Pittsburgh. Because of him, I decided to go to law school. I attended Duke because he was a graduate. I only applied to Duquesne, so it was fortunate that things worked out for me.

BN: Please tell us about significant career positions (before and/or after law school), such as, place of employment (law firm, city) and in which areas of the law you practiced.
I had my own law practice in Jaffrey from 1962-66. I was a partner in the firm Brighton, Fernald, Taft & Hampsey (Peterborough) from 1966 until Jan. 1990, when I was appointed. to the superior court. I was a judge for 39 years: Jaffrey District Court, now Jaffrey-Peterborough District Court, 1968-1990, then superior court from 1990 to 2007.

As an attorney, I was a general practitioner – just a country lawyer.

BN: What achievements are you most proud of professionally? Are there any moments in your career that were particularly significant for you? Did you take part in any memorable/notable cases that you would like to mention?
I was honored to preside over several notable murder cases and significant civil trials, rather than single out a specific case, I want to pay tribute to the good people who essentially donate their time to serve on our juries. They represent a cross-section of NH, but are very honest and serious about their work. They can see through all the fluff and arrive at a fair and just verdict. It makes you proud to be a part of the NH Judicial system.

BN: Please tell us about any community activities that have been of great significance to you and why.
I am proud to be an attorney for 50 years and to have served 39 years as a judge. Before I went on the superior court, I was the local district court judge, Jaffrey town moderator and the school district moderator. It took three people to replace me in 1990.

BN: Please tell us about your family (marriage(s), children, etc.).
While at Holy Cross, I went on a blind date with Jean Letourneau who was at Regis College. In 1960 we married, so we have 50 yrs. and counting. Erin [our daughter] is the oldest of three and has two children; she has two college degrees and worked as an RN. Kevin is the middle child; he has one son and owns a real estate business, Hampsey & Grenier. Charlie is a Holy Cross grad and married a Holy Cross classmate with three children. He lives in New York and works for a major pharmaceutical firm in customer development.

BN: Do you special plans for your retirement?
I have obligations at home that require most of my time. My wife and I hope to return to Ireland. It will be our 17th visit since 1985; I am fortunate to have reached this point in life and I am very grateful—50 years of a strong marriage, three wonderful children – 50 years as a NH attorney and 39 years on the district and superior court. Now if only we can stay happy and healthy.


Hon. Douglas S. Hatfield


Hon. Douglas S. Hatfield
BN: Please tell us how you feel about reaching this 50-year milestone and whether you are still practicing law.
I'm still practicing law and proud to be associated with so many extraordinary members of the Bar, especially the Class of '61. I'm especially proud in thinking of their contribution, both to the practice of law and the communities in which they live. I'm happy to be able to contribute in some small way to my community and the State of New Hampshire.

BN: Where were you born, raised and educated?
I was born in Plainfield, NJ, grew up in Peterborough, NH, and was educated in the Peterborough public school system, Colby College and Boston University School of Law.

BN: Why did you decide to become a lawyer? Who are/were your role models in the field of law or elsewhere?
I went to law school with the idea of using the legal education for governmental service. However, in working summers with Kenneth Brighton and Maurice Blodgett in Peterborough, I became enamored with the thought of being a country lawyer. Both Ken and Maurie would be considered role models for me. Ken, for his community involvement and Maurie for his thoroughness in legal decision-making. I would also comment that in 1962 when I moved to Hillsborough and basically practiced alone, I found extraordinary support from the clerks and judges in the court system, who always appeared willing to help young lawyers do a better job.

BN: Please tell us about significant career positions (before and/or after law school), such as, place of employment (law firm, city) and in which areas of the law you practiced.
I started practicing in Peterborough with Maurie Blodgett in 1961, moved to Hillsborough in 1962 to take over the practice of Wayne Crosby, who had been killed in an automobile accident. At that time I was associated with Nelson, Winer & Lynch of Milford. I grew the firm in Hillsborough through 2000 when the firm of Hatfield, Moran & Barry merged with Upton, Sanders & Smith of Concord and I now practice of counsel with the firm of Upton & Hatfield. I've always considered myself a country lawyer and a generalist, although in later years I developed specialties in representing school districts and in doing estate planning and trust administration. I also served as judge of the Hillsborough District Court from 1970 to 2005.

BN: What achievements are you most proud of professionally? Are there any moments in your career that were particularly significant for you? Did you take part in any memorable/notable cases that you would like to mention?
I am particularly proud of my work with the New Hampshire judiciary in connection with the district court system. In those early days of the 70s and 80s, the district courts were administered by a volunteer group of judges and I was privileged to be president of the District Court Judges Association. I think that group of judges made a major contribution to the integrity and quality of the district courts.

I am proud to have been part of a committee of judges (including Judge Leahy, Class of ‘61) that rewrote the juvenile law (RSA 169) and school law persons that drafted RSA 273-A (Public Employee Labor Law.)

Notable cases include the attempted takeover of Merrimack Farmers Exchange (we failed); Wehringer v. Bullen (New York City attorney tries to enforce contract against elderly widow to buy her land for half price – we won); State v. Kidder, as judge I sent to the Supreme Court the question, can attorney's action on behalf of client violate a court no contact protective order (yes).

As an attorney, there are many memorable moments, but the opportunity to be of assistance to my friends and neighbors within the community, whether it be providing legal services or serving the community on committee functions, is what I felt it was all about. It's probably not the memorable cases that made the life of a country lawyer memorable and notable.

BN: Please tell us about any community activities that have been of great significance to you and why.
My community activities include being very active with my local church and the state and national setting of the United Church of Christ. I served as a member of the Board of Governors of the Bar Association, president of the District Court Judges Association, president of the New Hampshire Estate Planning Council, on numerous local committees and boards, as director of the Monadnock division of the New Hampshire Charitable Foundation, as president of the Children's Alliance of New Hampshire, [board of] Havenwood-Heritage Heights, Big Brothers/Big Sisters and many others. Suffice it to say I have felt a commitment to give back to my community in any way I can.

BN: Please tell us about your family (marriage(s), children, etc.)
I married Judith Ingram, also a Colby graduate, in 1960 and she helped to support me in my last year at BU Law School. We have three children, David, Janet and Steven. David is a computer consultant in Minneapolis, Janet is an ordained pastor, living in Charlottesville, VA, and Steven is an architect living in North Haven, NY. We have four grandchildren, Madeline, Margaret, Leigh and Peter. Judy and I are particularly blessed with the opportunity to have significant family gatherings throughout the year.

BN: Do you have any special plans for your retirement?
My plans for retirement are simply to continue doing what I've been doing. I will continue to work in the office as long as I'm able to contribute and will continue with my charitable and non-profit volunteer work. I hope to continue to enjoy family gatherings and certainly hope to continue to enjoy some travel time.


David KillKelley


David KillKelley
BN:
Please tell us how you feel about reaching this 50-year milestone and whether you are still practicing law.
I feel both nostalgic and elated about reaching this 50-year milestone. Nostalgic because so many years have gone by and now the joys of a competitive law practice are behind me. Things will never be the same again. Elation because I have been able to live happily and successfully to this point with the realization that I still have a good future for pursuing new interests now that I am retired.

BN: Where were you born, raised and educated?
I was born in Concord, NH and raised in New Hampshire. I attended elementary school in Wilton and Manchester and high school in Manchester. I graduated from St. Anselm College in 1958 and from Boston College Law School in 1961.

BN: Are you a veteran? If so, where did you serve? Are there any comments you would like to make about your time in the military?
I was called to active duty with the Air Force in 1961/62. I also attended the Judge Advocate General Corps (JAG) School at the University of Virginia Law School and served as the legal officer for the NH Air National Guard for several years.

BN: Why did you decide to become a lawyer? Who are/were your role models in the field of law or elsewhere?
The legal profession was a personal career choice I made on my own.

BN: Please tell us about significant career positions (before and/or after law school), such as, place of employment (law firm, city) and in which areas of the law you practiced.
I passed both the NH and Mass. law exams in 1961. During the early years of my career, I practiced law in both those states. In 1967, I moved to Laconia, NH, and became a partner in the firm of Nighswander, Lord, Martin and KillKelley. I practiced law with that firm and also on my own. I was primarily a litigator during those years. I argued more than 70 published NH Supreme Court cases and several additional cases before the US Court of Appeals in Boston. I served on the executive committee of the NH Bar Association and later served on the Board of Governors of the Association. Also, I was president of the Belknap County Bar Association, served on the Board of Governors of the NH Trial Lawyers Association; and I was state membership chairman for the ABA for a number of years.

BN: What achievements are you most proud of professionally? Are there any moments in your career that were particularly significant for you? Did you take part in any memorable/ notable cases that you would like to mention?
I handled many cases raising issues involving various areas of law, including significant criminal and civil cases. For example, see State v. Fleury, 114 NH 325 (1974), a first degree capital murder in which I challenged the method of drawing juries in the superior courts and the case of In re Boston and Maine Corporation, 455F2d (1972) where I successfully challenged the manner in which the federal court in Boston was permitting the abandonment of railroad lines in New Hampshire. My proudest achievement was the case of In re Estate of Dionne, 128 NH 682 (1986), in which I successfully challenged as unconstitutional a nearly century-old state law requiring the payment of fees to the probate court by anyone applying for a special session. In the Dionne case at page 687, the Supreme Court stated:
“The fact that the unconstitutional arrangement embodied in RSA 547:23 has perpetuated itself for almost 100 years is attributable solely to the fact that this is the first case in which its constitutionality has been challenged in this court. That we now have the opportunity to decide its constitutionality results only from the fact that counsel in this case pursued his client’s cause with a vigor that is a credit to attorneys generally.”
BN: Please tell us about your family (marriage(s), children, etc.).
My wife Lucy and I were married in Manchester, NH, over 50 years ago and we have three children: a son in New York City, a married daughter in Portsmouth, NH and a married son in Shelburne, VT. We have four grandchildren.

BN: Do you have any special plans for your retirement?
I became inactive/retired on May 29, 2009. My wife and I now spend most of our time in Bonita Springs, FL where I go to court nearly every day, but this time it is the tennis court. I have also revived my interest in music and play in several (mostly Dixieland) bands in and around Fort Myers/Naples area of Florida. I plan to continue this very active lifestyle as long as I am able to do so.


Hon. Albert D. Leahy, Jr.


Hon. Albert D. Leahy, Jr.
BN:
Please tell us how you feel about reaching this 50-year milestone and whether you are still practicing law.
I am very impressed with the level of sophistication of many of today's practitioners. Specialization is the result of a much more complex society than existed when we were admitted. On the whole, the change has been positive but I miss the days when most of us were engaged in the more general practice of law.

BN: Where were you born, raised and educated?
I was born in Claremont and educated in the Claremont Public School System. I received a BA from Yale in 1955 and a JD from Harvard in 1961.

BN: Are you a veteran? If so, where did you serve? Are there any comments you would like to make about your time in the military?
I was privileged to serve as an officer in the Marine Corps from 1955 until 1958 and thoroughly enjoyed my tour of duty. Among other things it provided me with an opportunity to meet many truly fine people,

BN: Why did you decide to become a lawyer? Who are/were your role models in the field of law or elsewhere?
It isn't clear to me that I ever made a conscious decision to become a lawyer. My father and my Uncle John Leahy were both lawyers and it seemed a perfectly natural thing to do.

BN: Please tell us about significant career positions (before and/or after law school), such as, place of employment (law firm, city) and in which areas of the law you practiced. What achievements are you most proud of professionally?
Immediately after graduating from law school in 1961, I returned to Claremont and joined the firm of Leahy and Denault. In 1972, I was appointed Presiding Justice of the Claremont District Court by Governor Walter Peterson. I continued my law practice that included everything from title searches to jury trials, and was a Bar Examiner from 1971 until 1975. I have served on a number of commissions dealing with the structure of our court system. When the jurisdiction of the District Courts was expanded significantly, several of us (including Doug Hatfield) who were active members of the District Court Judges Association, encouraged and helped shape the form and extent of that expansion.

BN: Please tell us about any community activities that have been of great significance to you and why.
I have always been active in local affairs and have served on a number of boards including the Claremont National Bank and I was board chair of the Claremont Savings Bank. Presently I am a trustee of Valley Regional Hospital in Claremont.

In 1993, I was voted Citizen of the Year by the Claremont Chamber of Commerce. Early in my career I was among the founders of The Sullivan County Mental Health Association (later West Central Services). This has always been a source of particular satisfaction because as a District Court Judge I had an opportunity to observe this fine organization serve hundreds of people each year that otherwise might not have had access to help. My wife also served a term as its chair.

BN: Please tell us about your family (marriage(s), children, etc.).
I married Patricia Henry on Sept. 10, 1960, in Fairfield CT. When our children were grown, she earned a master’s degree in counseling and worked as a guidance counselor in the Claremont School System. Our daughter, Alison Angle of Derry, has a degree in special education and is teaching in the Timberlane School system. Our son William is the Director of Admission at Phillips Academy in Andover MA.

BN: Do you have special plans for your retirement?
I retired from active practice and the Court in 2001 and continue to enjoy retirement.


William T. Bigelow


William T. Bigelow
BN: Please tell us how you feel about reaching this 50-year milestone and whether you are still practicing law.
I retired in 1993 and continue to enjoy the good life as I attain 80.

Where were you born, raised and educated?
I was born in Norwood, MA, moved to Goffstown, NH at age 5 and was raised there. I graduated from Vermont Academy, St. Lawrence University and Boston University (LLB, LLM Taxation).

Are you a veteran? If so, where did you serve? Are there any comments you would like to make about your time in the military.
I enlisted in U S Army in 1952 and was discharged as a 1st Lieutenant in 1955.

Why did you decide to become a lawyer? Who are/were your role models in the field of law or elsewhere?
One of my military colleagues was a lawyer that I respected quite highly and because of him and my interest in history and government, I decided on the law profession. My role models were my father Nathaniel, and two of my senior partners, John Nassikas and Walker Wiggin.

Please tell us about significant career positions (before and/or after law school) such as place of employment (law firm, city) and in which areas of law you practiced.
I was a partner at Wiggin & Nourie, Manchester, in business and estate planning; I was also Legal Counsel to Governor Thomson and was engaged in many community and state activities.

What achievements are you most proud of professionally? Are there any moments in your career that were particularly significant for you? Did you take part in any memorable/notable cases that you would like to mention?
The opportunity, early on, to try cases, search titles, study taxation and get involved in other practice areas with strong mentors, something that is seldom available today, prepared me well for my later years in business matters. Successful clients and my time in Concord certainly were significant and memorable to me.

Please tell us about any community activities that have been of great significance to you and why.
Being a part of a good number of community organizations was fun and, I hope, productive. Boys and Girls Club, United Way, Rotary and Manchester Airport Authority are a few that were significant to me.

Please tell us about your family (marriage(s), children, etc.)
My marriage with Janis of 52 years is the best. Jennifer is a charge nurse in the brain trauma rehabilitation center at Crotched Mountain. Jonathan runs a very successful division of a media and business networking company in Hong Kong. Andy is a tenured high school history and social studies at the Francis Parker School in Chicago. Nate is Jennifer's 11-year-old son. Andy has two boys, Malik (15) and Fernelis (13).

Do you have special plans for your retirement?
I packed it in on April Fool's Day, 1993, and have never looked back. Life on Cape Cod has been totally satisfying and productive with new friends and activities. Our desire to stay involved with our new community resulted, for me, in being a museum trustee and treasurer, tax consultant for seniors and in teaching English as a second language, among other things.

Travels to Europe and Asia, plus lots of golf, tennis, boating and duplicate bridge have nicely rounded out our plans. And I still read cases and the Bar News and wonder how lawyers can keep up with how much they have to know and how little they get to use it; like the definition of a specialist who studies more and more about less and less until he knows everything about nothing.


Paul F. Cavanaugh


Paul F. Cavanaugh
BN: Please tell us how you feel about reaching this 50-year milestone and whether you are still practicing law.
I am still the City Solicitor for Concord but I plan to retire in October.

Where were you born, raised, and educated?
I was born and raised in Boston and graduated from Northeastern University and Boston College Law School.

Are you a veteran? If so, where did you serve? Are there any comments you would like to make about your time in the military?
I served in the U.S. Army in the Army Security Agency. It was a very informative experience.

Why did you decide to become a lawyer? Who are/were your role models in the field of law or elsewhere?
I became interested in the law while in the army.

Please tell us about significant career positions (before and/or after law school), such as, place of employment (law firm, city) and in which areas of the law you practiced.
I have served as Town Counsel for the Town of Provincetown, Legal Assistant to the Suffolk County District Attorney (Boston), and City Attorney of Winooski, Vermont and City Solicitor of Concord.

What achievements are you most proud of professionally? Are there any moments in your career that were particularly significant for you? Did you take part in any memorable/notable cases that you would like to mention?
I am proud of the fact that the municipalities I served never suffered a major legal set back while I was their attorney.

Please tell us about your family (marriage(s), children, etc.).
I have been married to my wife, Mary Ryder, for over fifty years. We have 12 children and 28 grandchildren. Four of my children are lawyers.

Do you special plans for your retirement?
No.


Charles A. DeGrandpre


Charles A. DeGrandpre
BN: Please tell us how you feel about reaching this 50-year milestone and whether you are still practicing law.
I am still practicing law on a part-time basis, and will continue to do so for the foreseeable future, where I [will] act as Trustee in some particular family cases. However, for all intents and purposes, I will be retired by the end of 2011. I am enjoying my extra time to do a lot of reading, walking and many other leisure time activities. Most importantly of all, I am enjoying my three children and their spouses and my ten grandchildren.

Where were you born, raised and educated?
I was born in Manchester, but raised and educated through high school in Jaffrey, New Hampshire. My father worked in a factory all his life at minimum salary, but managed to get myself and my three siblings all through college. I have French Canadian background on both sides and am very proud of my heritage.

After high school, I went on to Clark University in Worcester where I majored in History and then went on to the University of Michigan Law School.

Are you a veteran? If so, where did you serve? Are there any comments you would like to make about your time in the military?
I am a veteran and was honorably discharged in 1968 as a First Lieutenant in the US Army. I served under the six-month active program followed by five-and-a-half years of weekly service and two weeks in the summer. I never served overseas and do not consider myself a true veteran in the sense that our service members serving overseas should be so designated.

Why did you decide to become a lawyer? Who are/were your role models in the field of law or elsewhere?
I became a lawyer because I couldn't decide what else to do when I was in college. I only decided at the end of my junior year – and it was Attorney Nicholas Longo, who was a friend and mentor of mine [who helped me decide]. Nicholas Longo, preceded me to the University of Michigan and urged me to attend. I didn't really like law school, but, once I started practicing law, I loved the practice of law and the challenges that it presented me.

Please tell us about significant career positions (before and/or after law school), such as, place of employment (law firm, city) and in which areas of the law you practiced.
I am proud to say that I have been employed at the McLane Law Firm for 50 years, my sole employer in the law. I started out as a general practitioner, specializing in title work, and gradually became interested and expert in the field of Trusts and Estates law. I have had a very diverse practice and a good run at the law. I have been involved in many notable cases and have written professionally on legal issues. I particularly take pride in my 40-year authorship of the Lex Loci column (NH Bar Journal) and the authorship of my first legal treatise, Wills, Trusts and Gifts. The latter was a labor of love and took me many years to complete.

Please tell us about any community activities that have been of great significance to you and why.
I have served on many community boards as I believe it is important for lawyers to give back to their community. I have served both as member of a board and, on several occasions, as the chief volunteer executive of several organizations.

Please tell us about your family (marriage(s), children, etc.).
I have been married twice and have three children and ten grandchildren. I am currently happily in love with my domestic companion, Marcia Markis.

Do you have special plans for your retirement?
I continue to want to stay healthy and enjoy my leisure time. I am particularly enjoying seeing my children and grandchildren grow up and exploit the many opportunities that lie before them. I hope to be of financial assistance to help in the education of my grandchildren as I did for my own children, but I do not expect, nor consider it important, to leave any substantial amounts of money to my family.


Rodney N. Dyer


Rodney N. Dyer
BN: Please tell us how you feel about reaching this 50-year milestone and whether you are still practicing law.
I am honored to be a lawyer and grateful for the opportunity to have practiced law for 50 years. There have, of course, been times when I wished I had been anything but a lawyer, but for the most part the practice has been fulfilling. I am still practicing full-time and I will continue to do so as long as the practice of law continues to stimulate me and I feel capable of serving my clients.

Where were you born, raised and educated?
I was born in Laconia and attended Laconia Schools. My college was the University of New Hampshire, from which I graduated in 1958. I then attended Boston University School of Law, graduating in 1961.

Are you a veteran? If so, where did you serve? Are there any comments you would like to make about your time in the military?
No. However, I am a war orphan as my father was killed in action during World War II while serving in the Marine Corps. The State Legislature passed a law permitting war orphans to attend UNH tuition-free and with free room and board. I will always be grateful for that opportunity, as otherwise it was unlikely that I would have been able to go to college. I was also able to receive my father’s GI Bill, which permitted me to obtain a law degree at Boston University.

Why did you decide to become a lawyer? Who are/were your role models in the field of law or elsewhere?
I discovered an interest in law while majoring in government at UNH. In addition, I had a great-grandfather who practiced law in Laconia for more than 50 years, and I believe that this highlighted my interest in becoming a lawyer. I would say that Harold Wescott, Hugh Bownes and FE Normandin were my role models during my younger years as a lawyer. All were exceptional lawyers who took an interest in a young lawyer. They helped me find my moral compass. The person who has had the most influence throughout my legal career is my mentor/partner and friend, Peter Millham.

Please tell us about significant career positions (before and/or after law school), such as place of employment (law firm, city) and in which areas of the law you practiced.
I joined the law firm of Wescott & Millham in 1964, and I have remained a member of the firm for almost my entire career. I had a general practice in my earlier career and, like many lawyers of my generation, I handled most of the matters which came in the door. My practice gradually changed as I became more and more involved in real estate in the Lakes Region, particularly commercial/residential developments and condominiums.

What achievements are you most proud of professionally? Are there any moments in your career that were particularly significant for you? Did you take part in any memorable/notable cases that you would like to mention?
I acted as a resource for New Hampshire’s Condominium Act, which was enacted in 1977. I also worked with then Assistant Attorney General Bill Roberts in formulating rules and regulations which implemented that Act.

Phil Hollman (later Judge Phillip Hollman) and I carried the bags for Stanley Brown in a notable libel case called Baer v. Rosenblatt, which made its way to the US Supreme Court. I also tried a number of Superior Court cases with the always controversial, but fascinating, F. Lee Bailey.

I was trial counsel in 1963 for a case in which the Tilton Chief of Police sued the Town, two doctors and other defendants for false imprisonment. He was arrested by his own police force and involuntarily committed to the State Hospital. Lead counsel suffered a heart attack on the first day of trial, and thus I had to take over, having no jury experience, with seven attorneys on the other side, including Irving Soden. During the course of the trial a key witness and a juror died, and the Presiding Justice died a week after the case concluded. More notably, President Kennedy was assassinated in the middle of this 28-day trial, which at the time was the longest jury trial in the history of Belknap County. This was also the initial appearance of Dr. Glenn Bricker as a medical legal witness. Those who have been around for awhile will recognize that name. I lost.

Please tell us about any community activities that have been of great significance to you and why.
I have also had what I consider a parallel career in public service, having served as Laconia City Attorney, mayor and head of a number of community organizations. I am currently Chairman of the Laconia Savings Bank.

Please tell us about your family (marriage(s), children, etc.).
I met my wife, Gail, at a UNH Homecoming party. We have been married since 1963 and have two adult children, as well as two grandchildren. Our eldest granddaughter is a college freshman.

Do you have special plans for your retirement?
What retirement?

Note: The Class of 1961 meets annually at the Common Man in Concord – Rod.


Chester H. Lopez, Jr.


Chester H. Lopez, Jr.
BN: Please tell us how you feel about reaching this 50-year milestone and whether you are still practicing law.
I am amazed that it has passed by so quickly. In my view, since I am still active in the practice of business law, 50 years is only a milestone and not the end of the run. During this period the fundamentals of practice have remained the same, but the technology of law certainly has increased the pace of practice. One can debate whether this is entirely beneficial. I certainly have enjoyed being a part of the New Hampshire practice for this period.

Where were you born, raised and educated?
I was born in Yarmouth, Maine, raised in Portland, attended Deering High School and then Colby College (1958) * and the University of Chicago Law School (JD 1961). I was hired by Hamblett, Kerrigan and Hamblett in January, 1961 and became an associate attorney with the firm when I passed the bar in September of that year.

* I was the first in my family to attend college and graduate school.

Why did you decide to become a lawyer? Who are/were your role models in the field of law or elsewhere?
That decision was made late in the game during my final year in college. I think I had some doubts after my first round of exams in law school. Fortunately things improved after that, convincing me I had made a prudent decision for career path. I had several professors that impressed me greatly during law school, including the key drafters of The Uniform Commercial Code, which had just been adopted in NH. My “presumed” knowledge in this area made me quite valuable to those members in my firm who practiced commercial law as it existed “pre-code.”

Please tell us about significant career positions (before and/or after law school), such as, place of employment (law firm, city) and in which areas of the law you practiced.
I am one of those rare attorneys who has only practiced with one firm for my entire career. I am not quite sure why, but probably for the same reasons I have been married to the same lovely, devoted and often forgiving, spouse.

Business law covers a very wide area, and certainly broader than one specific area in which I spend a substantial portion of my time, which is primarily involvement with closely held or family businesses, from their formation to their sale or their dissolution. I have been fortunate to have been listed in the New Hampshire section of “The Best Lawyers in America” under corporate law, since its inception many years ago. I also co-chaired a special committee of the NH Bar Association which created the first comprehensive revision and modernization of this state’s business corporation laws.

I also served for several years as a member of the NH Supreme Court Professional Conduct Committee.

I am a member of the Nashua, New Hampshire and American Bar Associations as well as a Fellow of the NH Bar Association.

Please tell us about any community activities that have been of great significance to you and why.
I served for many years as a member of the board of trustees of Southern NH Medical Center and chaired the board for two years. I am a long time member and former president of the Nashua Rotary Club. I am a former director of the Greater Nashua United Way and still serve on its Community Investments Committee. I am currently counsel to the American Baptist Churches of Vermont and New Hampshire and a former member on its board of trustees and a former president.

Please tell us about your family (marriage(s), children, etc.).
I married Mary L. Lopez on Sept 6, 1958. We have three children: Steven, Gary and Susan and two grandchildren, Alex and Mia.

Do you special plans for your retirement?
I am not sure I know what that word means. I would like to continue in the practice of law as long as my physical and mental abilities permit.


Hon. Francis B. McCaffrey

BN: Please tell us how you feel about reaching this 50-year milestone and whether you are still practicing law.
Grateful!

I am presently a retired Trial Court Judge. (Superior, District Family Courts were merged into Superior Court in 2010.) I served from 1980 thru 2003 in the Vermont District Court. I was the Chief Administrative Judge for the trial courts for the last six years of my tenure. I presently preside as a retired judge in the Rutland Drug Treatment Court. This is part of Superior Court, Criminal Division. I have held that position for the past 3 years. The Drug Court is a treatment court dealing with non-violent offenders who have addiction issues or what we call co-occurring mental health diseases.

Where were you born, raised and educated?
I was born in Queens, New York, and raised in Manhasset, Long Island. I went to Chaminade HS, 1954, Mineola, NY; St Michael’s College, 1958 -Colchester VT; Fordham Law School, 1961- New York City.

Are you a veteran? If so, where did you serve? Are there any comments you would like to make about your time in the military?
No.

Why did you decide to become a lawyer? Who are/were your role models in the field of law or elsewhere?
As a Liberal Arts major in college, [I thought] it seemed like a good fit. It turned out better than I could ever have expected. My time on the bench has been rewarding.

Role models- Justices Brennan, Powell and Souter.

Please tell us about significant career positions (before and/or after law school), such as, place of employment (law firm, city) and in which areas of the law you practiced.
Terhune, Gibbons and Mulvehill, 1961-1963 New York City – Insurance defense; Wyman, Bean and Tefft, 1963-1966 Manchester, NH-general practice; St Michael’s College, 1966-1969- Colchester VT-Ass’t to the President; Sullivan and McCaffrey, 1969-1980, Rutland, VT-general practice; State of Vermont- Trial Judge 1980-2003; Administrative Judge for Trial Courts 1988-2003; Rutland Drug Court 2007 to date (Drug Treatment Court).

What achievements are you most proud of professionally? Are there any moments in your career that were particularly significant for you? Did you take part in any memorable/notable cases that you would like to mention?
My time with Wyman, Bean and Tefft was significant. Working with Arthur Bean and Stan Tefft was a wonderful experience. (Lou Wyman was serving in Congress at the time.)

Please tell us about any community activities that have been of great significance to you and why.
Rutland City School Board-1972-1975; State of Vermont- Legislative Committee on Medical Marijuana-2002; various legislative and court committees.

Please tell us about your family (marriage(s), children, etc.).
Married to Rita Whalen in 1960 –to date. We have four children, Marybeth, James, Tricia and Joseph; and six grandchildren.

We presently live on the grounds of Weston Priory in Weston, VT

Do you have any special plans for your retirement?
No, I am trying to put it off as long as I can!


Frederick W. Murdock, Jr.


Frederick W. Murdock, Jr.
BN: Please tell us how you feel about reaching this 50-year milestone and whether you are still practicing law.
I am pleased to be alive at this age and in relatively good health. I am still practicing law full time and honored to be a member of the New Hampshire Bar Association for the past fifty years.

Where were you born, raised and educated?
I was born in Brockton, Massachusetts and graduated from Brockton High School. I attended several colleges thereafter and received my Bachelor’s Degree from Antioch College in Yellow Springs, Ohio, and my law degree from Boston University School of Law.

Are you a veteran? If so, where did you serve? Are there any comments you would like to make about your time in the military?
I served in the United States Navy and was stationed at the Massachusetts Maritime Academy in Buzzards Bay, MA on the vessel entitled “Massachusetts.”

Why did you decide to become a lawyer? Who are/were your role models in the field of law or elsewhere?
I was preparing to become an accountant and having worked for several accounting firms during my college educations, I felt I wished to become a lawyer. I would not say that I had, or have, a role model, but I have a great deal of respect for many lawyers I have dealt with during my career.

Please tell us about significant career positions (before and/or after law school), such as, place of employment (law firm, city) and in which areas of the law you practiced.
I practice mostly in the fields of business law and estate work and have been very fortunate to serve my clients being a lawyer in New Hampshire and Massachusetts.

My practice is mostly in the Merrimack Valley area, Rockingham County and Essex County, with offices in Salem, NH and Methuen, MA.

What achievements are you most proud of professionally? Are there any moments in your career that were particularly significant for you? Did you take part in any memorable/notable cases that you would like to mention?
I am pleased to have helped my clients over many difficult times and circumstances, and of course, there are memories of the cases and results, both positive and negative. I have good friends and associates and have relied upon their judgments in legal and practical matters.

The character traits that have guided my career consist of honesty, common sense, luck, family, humility, understanding and treating others as you wish to be treated.

Please tell us about any community activities that have been of great significance to you and why.
I keep a very low profile in the community attributed mainly due to my work load and being a sole practitioner; my available free time for community activities is very limited.

Please tell us about your family (marriage(s), children, etc.).
I am married to a wonderful wife, have one son who resides in California. I am truly blessed with a family that cares.

Do you special plans for your retirement?
I am in hopes that my health will allow me to continue my practice and that my clients will continue to feel a need for my service. I do not plan to retire at this time.

Some of the basic principals I have followed over the years are:

A. Listen to what the clients want to tell you and take time to think through the solutions, knowing that there may be alternatives.
B. Try to explain the legal issues and the practical side of the solution, including the costs, time commitment and possible results.
C. I did not begin a case if I felt that it was very questionable merit, and/or if the only parties who might benefit were the attorneys and their hired experts.
D. Be honest and kind to others, as there is no need to convince others of any importance I may have.
I would hope that I may be remembered, as set forth above, by those who know me and remember that living is about people, not wealth or property.


David William O’Brien


David William O’Brien
BN: Please tell us how you feel about reaching this 50-year milestone and whether you are still practicing law.
I am still practicing law. Nice having made the 50-year mark and hope for another 10.

Where were you born, raised and educated?
Born (1928) and raised at Campton, NH. I was educated at Campton Elementary, Plymouth High School, the University at Plymouth and the University of San Francisco.

Are you a veteran? If so, where did you serve? Are there any comments you would like to make about your time in the military?
I volunteered for the Korean War. I served as a Special Agent in the Counter Intelligence Corps. I believe all men and woman should receive some training in some branch of the Armed Forces of the United States.

Why did you decide to become a lawyer? Who are/were your role models in the field of law or elsewhere?
A very famous lawyer from Plymouth, called, Attorney Stuyvesant, impressed me when I was very young, as to the importance of folks being properly represented when they were faced with a serious legal problem. He was very, very kind in manner and spoke with great eloquence in the courtroom and at town hall meetings.

Please tell us about significant career positions (before and/or after law school), such as, place of employment (law firm, city) and in which areas of the law you practiced.
1. High School teacher at Sanborn Seminary, Kingston, NH
2. Senior Counsel at State Compensation Insurance Fund, State of California
3. Deputy Commissioner of Corporations, State of California
4. Workers’ Compensation Judge, State of California
5. Administrative Law Judge, State of California
6. Professor of Law, Valley Law School, California
7. Private practice of law, representing injured workers.
8. TV show, “Judge O’Brien and the law.”
9. Defense attorney (workers’ compensation); law firm: Floyd, Skeren & Kelly, California and Nevada. Presently employed.

What achievements are you most proud of professionally? Are there any moments in your career that were particularly significant for you? Did you take part in any memorable/notable cases that you would like to mention?
Author of three law books:
1. California Workers’ Compensation Law, 13th edition, available online for free worldwide, by Googling “Judge O’Brien”.
2. California Unemployment and Disability Insurance, 11th edition, also available online, worldwide, for free;
3. Misconduct cases, 3rd edition

All books published by Floyd, Skeren & Kelly.

Please tell us about any community activities that have been of great significance to you and why.
Probably I derived the most pleasure from the TV show where I could help working people understand their legal rights and responsibilities when it came to injuries on-the-job, unemployment insurance issues and social security issues, as well as general questions involving labor laws.

Please tell us about your family (marriage(s), children, etc.)
I married Mary Ruth Jiminez in 1955 in San Francisco, Cal. We have five daughters, five sons-in-law, fifteen grandchildren and one great grandson.

Do you have special plans for your retirement?
No. I hope to practice law and keep my law books up-to-date, as long as I am mentally and physically capable.


Otto F. Stock

After 1961, I pursued government and business careers in Ohio [where Mr. Stock now lives] and during this period and the retirement that followed, I was pleased to support the Association by paying dues as an out-of-state member.

NHLAP: A confidential Independent Resource

Home | About the Bar | For Members | For the Public | Legal Links | Publications | Online Store
Lawyer Referral Service | Law-Related Education | NHBA•CLE | NHBA Insurance Agency | NHMCLE
Search | Calendar

New Hampshire Bar Association
2 Pillsbury Street, Suite 300, Concord NH 03301
phone: (603) 224-6942 fax: (603) 224-2910
email: NHBAinfo@nhbar.org
© NH Bar Association Disclaimer