A Lawyer & Judge in Every School – May 5, 2023

This event pairs attorneys and judges with classrooms throughout the state to discuss concepts of law, rights and responsibilities of citizenship, and additional legal issues consistent with student interest and the course curriculum. For Law Day 2023, the NHBA LRE program encourages attorney presenters to bring one of the following topics, or a topic of your choice, to classrooms across the state.

Cornerstones of Democracy
Civics | Civility | Collaboration

The 2023 Law Day theme is “Cornerstones of Democracy: Civics, Civility, and Collaboration.” We invite all the people of the United States to join us in rebuilding trust in our institutions, respect for one another, and our willingness to collaborate to address the challenges that face our nation.

In recent years, tensions in our democratic system have revealed deep divisions in American society. These divisions are aggravated by incivility in public discourse and insufficient understanding among many people about the Constitution and the way American government works. Together, however, we can collaborate to overcome our differences, resolve our disputes, and preserve our democracy and republic. To that end, we call on members of the legal profession to lead the way in promoting civics, civility, and collaboration—the cornerstones of our democracy.

ABA Civic Literacy Survey – The Findings

According to a new national poll conducted by the American Bar Association, less than half of the U.S. public knows that John Roberts is chief justice of the U.S. Supreme Court, while almost one-quarter think it is Ruth Bader Ginsburg and 16 percent believe it is Clarence Thomas.

The nationally representative poll of 1,000 members of the American public found troubling gaps in their knowledge of American history and government, as well as constitutional rights. One in 10 think the Declaration of Independence freed slaves in the Confederate states and almost 1 in 5 believe the first 10 amendments of the U.S. Constitution are called the Declaration of Independence instead of the Bill of Rights.”